Trinity Bellwoods

Overview

The focal point of the Trinity Bellwoods neighbourhood is the park of the same name, one of the largest, most historic, popular and beautiful green spaces in Toronto. Its presence, especially with its scenic and paved walking path, lends the area — in the heart of downtown Toronto — a lush and calm oasis in the midst of its bustling streets.

The neighbourhood itself — bordered roughly by Bathurst Street on the east, College Street on the north, Dovercourt Road on the west and Queen Street West on the south — is known for its arts flavour and culinary delights, especially along Queen. The neighbourhood is a popular destination for those looking for art galleries (the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art is in Trinity Bellwoods), antique shops, bookstores, natural food markets, fashion and accessory stores and a variety of cafes and restaurants. For those looking for an old-fashioned coffee shop, this is also the neighbourhood to be in.

On Ossington Avenue in the west of the neighbourhood, there is one of the highest concentrations of bars and restaurants in Toronto, reflecting the youthful demographic in the area, and making Ossington a prime spot for city nightlife.

Part of Trinity Bellwoods is known as Little Portugal, and the neighbourhood also has a heavy Brazilian flavour to it. The northern edge of Trinity Bellwoods also includes part of Little Italy. That population is reflected in many of the area’s restaurants and stores, and every four years — when World Cup fever hits — the neighbourhood all but shuts down, although very loudly, for the duration of the tournament.

History and Social Profile

In the early 1800s, Trinity Bellwoods was part of a tract of land belonging to Captain Samuel Smith. Smith named his 100-acre park lot Gore Vale. Gore was in honour of Lieutenant-Governor Francis Gore, and Vale referred to the Garrison Creek ravine that is now the home of most of Trinity Bellwoods Park. This creek, now a buried city storm sewer, still actually flows under the park.

The park was the original site of Trinity College, one of the colleges that now make up the University of Toronto. The college buildings were completed in 1852, although the college merged with the University of Toronto in 1904 and moved to its current location in 1925. The original buildings were sold to the city and were mostly destroyed in the 1950s. In fact, the only remaining traces of the school are the stone and iron gates at the Queen Street entrance to the park.

Today, as well as its natural beauty, the park is the site of a popular toboggan run in winter, a well-frequented dog park (as seen in the movie Dog Park), a well-used community athletic centre including two swimming pools, outdoor volleyball and tennis courts, a large playground, a hockey rink, fields for soccer, football and rugby, and three softball fields.

The park has also become a popular site for local musicians. The Live in Bellwoods series of videos features acoustic performances by local and visiting artists in various areas of the park.

The neighbourhood itself has gone through a number of demographic changes. After Trinity College moved, the area became the destination for immigrants from a variety of cultures. But by the 1960s, Trinity Bellwoods had acquired the distinctive Portuguese character that marks it today. In recent years, though, the area has also become the site of condo development and house restoration, as its charm has made it a popular home for those looking for a part of downtown Toronto with the best traits of a small town.

The focal point of the Trinity Bellwoods neighbourhood is the park of the same name, one of the largest, most historic, popular and beautiful green spaces in Toronto. Its presence, especially with its scenic and paved walking path, lends the area — in the heart of downtown Toronto — a lush and calm oasis in the midst of its bustling streets.

The neighbourhood itself — bordered roughly by Bathurst Street on the east, College Street on the north, Dovercourt Road on the west and Queen Street West on the south — is known for its arts flavour and culinary delights, especially along Queen. The neighbourhood is a popular destination for those looking for art galleries (the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art is in Trinity Bellwoods), antique shops, bookstores, natural food markets, fashion and accessory stores and a variety of cafes and restaurants. For those looking for an old-fashioned coffee shop, this is also the neighbourhood to be in.

On Ossington Avenue in the west of the neighbourhood, there is one of the highest concentrations of bars and restaurants in Toronto, reflecting the youthful demographic in the area, and making Ossington a prime spot for city nightlife.

Part of Trinity Bellwoods is known as Little Portugal, and the neighbourhood also has a heavy Brazilian flavour to it. The northern edge of Trinity Bellwoods also includes part of Little Italy. That population is reflected in many of the area’s restaurants and stores, and every four years — when World Cup fever hits — the neighbourhood all but shuts down, although very loudly, for the duration of the tournament.

History and Social Profile

In the early 1800s, Trinity Bellwoods was part of a tract of land belonging to Captain Samuel Smith. Smith named his 100-acre park lot Gore Vale. Gore was in honour of Lieutenant-Governor Francis Gore, and Vale referred to the Garrison Creek ravine that is now the home of most of Trinity Bellwoods Park. This creek, now a buried city storm sewer, still actually flows under the park.

The park was the original site of Trinity College, one of the colleges that now make up the University of Toronto. The college buildings were completed in 1852, although the college merged with the University of Toronto in 1904 and moved to its current location in 1925. The original buildings were sold to the city and were mostly destroyed in the 1950s. In fact, the only remaining traces of the school are the stone and iron gates at the Queen Street entrance to the park.

Today, as well as its natural beauty, the park is the site of a popular toboggan run in winter, a well-frequented dog park (as seen in the movie Dog Park), a well-used community athletic centre including two swimming pools, outdoor volleyball and tennis courts, a large playground, a hockey rink, fields for soccer, football and rugby, and three softball fields.

The park has also become a popular site for local musicians. The Live in Bellwoods series of videos features acoustic performances by local and visiting artists in various areas of the park.

The neighbourhood itself has gone through a number of demographic changes. After Trinity College moved, the area became the destination for immigrants from a variety of cultures. But by the 1960s, Trinity Bellwoods had acquired the distinctive Portuguese character that marks it today. In recent years, though, the area has also become the site of condo development and house restoration, as its charm has made it a popular home for those looking for a part of downtown Toronto with the best traits of a small town.

Acclaimed Restaurants/Cafés

  • Pizzerio Libretto
  • Mother’s Dumplings
  • Black Hoof
  • Utopia Café & Grill
  • Terroni

Public Transportation

  • Ossington Subway
  • College Streetcar
  • Queen Streetcar
  • Ossington Bus
  • Bathurst Streetcar

Streetcar service on Bathurst Street and bus service on Ossington Avenue provide regular access to the Bloor-Danforth subway.

Public Schools

  • Charles G. Fraser Jr., 79 Manning Ave., (416) 393-1830
  • Grace Street Jr., 65 Grace Street, (416) 393-1820
  • Givens/Shaw Jr. & Sr., 180 Shaw Street, (416) 393-1240

Public High Schools

  • Central High School of Commerce, 570 Shaw St., (416) 393-0030
  • Harbord Collegiate Institute, 286 Harbord St., (416) 393-1650

Catholic Schools

  • Senator Santo Christo, 30 Humbert St., (416) 393-5367
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Listings

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Ossington And Queen
102 Ossington Ave $3,350 / month Move in: Nov 1st
1 BDR
2 BATH
1100-1500 FT2
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Dundas / Bathurst
167 Markham St $2,399,000 Days on market: 7
5+3 BDR
5 BATH
3000-3500 FT2
2
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West From Ossington
48 Foxley St $2,685,000 Days on market: 7
4+1 BDR
5 BATH
1
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College/Bathurst
356 Euclid Ave $3,200 / month Move in: Immeidate
2 BDR
1 BATH
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Queen St W/Ossington Ave
9 Givins St $3,850 / month Move in: Oct 15 2018
3 BDR
2 BATH
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Beatrice B/W College &Dundas
127 Beatrice St PRIVATE LISTING Register or login to view
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South Off College Street
88 Montrose Ave $2,650 / month Move in: Sept. 24/18
2+1 BDR
1 BATH
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Ossington Ave And Queen St
13 Rebecca St $599,900 Days on market: 7
2 BDR
1 BATH
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Dundas/Dovercourt
145 Dovercourt Rd $2,600,000 Days on market: 7
9+2 BDR
8 BATH
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Queen St. W/Trinity Bellwoods
90 Manning Ave PRIVATE LISTING Register or login to view
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Condos for lease 2
Avg. Price $2,500

Houses for lease 4
Avg. Price $3,263

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Avg. Price $895,800

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Avg. Price $1,995,317 Scroll to Listings